Buttermilk Pancakes

Happy 2013!

I hope you all had a restful and enjoyable holiday season. I definitely enjoyed some time off from work, being with family and friends, and just relaxing! It’ll be a little tough to readjust to having to go to work (I am not even sure I remember what my alarm sounds like, quite frankly), but it’ll be nice to get back into a routine. And, getting back into a steady routine means spending more time in the kitchen, trying and writing new recipes… I’m excited to get started!

If, like me, you work somewhere that doesn’t close on bank holidays, the start of a new year brings a 5-month drought of paid days off. As the year stretches out in front of me, and the Memorial Day long weekend feels a million miles away, weekends become more treasured than ever – I try to do whatever I can to make them feel like mini vacations. Often, that means I cook a more-complicated-than-usual breakfast (meaning, something that takes more effort than scrambling a couple eggs, or pouring some cereal into a bowl). My recent favorite is buttermilk pancakes. I typically have all the ingredients on hand, they’re quick to make, and they’re REALLY good… I see a lot of buttermilk pancakes in my Sunday morning future!

Buttermilk Pancakes

Buttermilk Pancakes
original recipe here
serves 2-4

1 cup all purpose flour
1 tsp baking soda
1/2 tsp salt
1 egg
1 cup buttermilk, well-shaken
Salted butter, for greasing the griddle

1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk together the flour, baking soda, salt, egg, and buttermilk until just combined. The batter will be a bit lumpy.

2. Allow the batter to sit while you heat your griddle. Heat your griddle (or non-stick pan, or well-seasoned cast iron pan) over medium low heat, making sure you allow it enough time to get good and hot.

3. Lightly grease your pan with salted butter. Use a 1/4 cup measure to scoop batter on to the griddle, lightly spreading the batter into about a 4″ circle (my griddle holds two pancakes at a time; you can do as many at once as your griddle or pan will hold, without them running into each other).

4. The pancakes are ready to flip after about 90 seconds, when small bubbles have formed on the surface, and the edges are starting to look slightly firm and set. Use a thin, flexible spatula to flip them; if the pancakes don’t seem to be holding together when you try to flip them, give them another 30 seconds and then try again. Once they’re flipped, they need another minute or so on the second side.

Buttermilk Pancakes

5. Continue until all the batter has been used. You can keep the finished pancakes warm in a 250 degree oven, or just on a plate covered with a clean dish towel (this way they stay warm, but don’t get soggy).

This recipe makes about 8 four-inch pancakes. They turn out very thick and hearty, and are quite filling; I can usually only eat 2, and my husband can typically eat 3. So, depending one everyone’s appetites, one batch will feed 2-4 people nicely.

Buttermilk Pancakes with Raspberry Syrup

You can top these however you’d like! I prefer just a bit of butter, my husband likes syrup, and occasionally I’ll do something crazy like make my own fruit syrup (to make the raspberry syrup pictured, simply combine 2/3 cup sugar, 2/3 cup water, and 6 oz. raspberries in a small saucepan and boil until sufficiently thickened). They’re not overly sweet, exceptionally light and fluffy, and a great way to start off a lazy weekend morning! Pair them with a few slices of bacon for maximum enjoyment.

Advertisements

One thought on “Buttermilk Pancakes

  1. Pingback: Maple Candied Bacon | The Dough Will Rise Again

you don't have to burn atlanta to make a statement...

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s